Podcast 097 – “Psychedelic Research in the 1960s” (Part 1)

Guest speaker: Gary Fisher
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PROGRAM NOTES:

(Minutes : Seconds into program)
Our conversation began by looking at photos of some of Gary’s former students, patients, and famous friends.

13:12 We begin a discussion of Gary’s work in the 1960s with severely emotionally disturbed children suffering from variants of childhood schizophrenia and infantile autism who he treated with LSD and psilocybin.

16:36 Al Hubbard is discussed

18:23 Gary Fisher: “All our model was from Hubbard, because Hubbard was the guy who taught my brother-in-law and Duncan Blewett. . . . He was the father of all this stuff. . . . He was the one who introduced Osmond and Hoffer to this whole approach.”

25:45 Gary provides more details about his work with the severely disturbed children, beginning with the story of Nancy’s nearly miraculous improvement after being treated with LSD.

35:59 Gary describes the deplorable conditions in the public hospital wards where severely disturbed children were being held.

THE LINKS BELOW
will take you to several articles by Dr. Fisher that have been posted on the Web stie of the Albert Hofmann Foundationin The Gary Fisher Collection:

Treatment of Childhood Schizophrenia Utilizing LSD and Psilocybin
by Gary Fisher, Ph.D.

A Note of the Successful Outcome of a Single Dose LSD Experience in a Patient Suffering from Grand Mal Epilepsy
Gary Fisher, Ph.D.

Some Comments Concerning Dosage Levels Of Psychedelic Compounds For Psychotherapeutic Experiences [Print-friendly copy]
by Gary Fisher, Ph.D.

Death, Identity, and Creativity
by Gary Fisher, Ph.D.

Successful Outcome of a Single LSD Treatment in a Chronically Dysfunctional Man
by Gary Fisher, Ph.D.

The Psychotherapeutic Use Of Psychodysleptic Drugs
by Gary Fisher, Ph.D. and Joyce Martin M.D.

Psychotherapy for the Dying:
Principles and Illustrative Cases with Special Reference to the use of LSD

by Gary Fisher, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor, Division of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, School of Public Health. University of California, Los Angeles

Counter-Transference Issues in Psychedelic Psychotherapy
by Gary Fisher, PH.D

2 Comments »

  1. xalos Said,

    June 13, 2010 @ 2:14 am

    Now this is just a theory, but it has to come up some way or another. You’re all aware that a psychedelic drug called DMT is present in most humans in small quantities, right? You’re also aware that psychedelic drugs have effects on neurotransmitters, right?

    Well, here’s my possible theory: those affected with autism lack any DMT to take on emotional processing. Although I experienced heavy pain at birth, I couldn’t feel it emotionally. I didn’t cry. I did not learn the English language emotionally, but as a result of patterns and repetitions. I refused to accept the state of today’s society, because I managed to resist emotional coercion

  2. xalos Said,

    June 13, 2010 @ 3:33 am

    Now this is just a theory, but it has to come up some way or another. You’re all aware that a psychedelic drug called DMT is present in most humans in certain quantities, right? You’re also aware that psychedelic drugs have emotional effects on neurotransmitters, right?

    Well, here’s my possible theory: those affected with autism lack any DMT to take on emotional processing. Although I experienced heavy pain at birth, I couldn’t feel it emotionally. I didn’t cry. I did not learn the English language emotionally, but as a result of patterns and repetitions. I believe my father had the same DMT-deficiency, because he had no emotional processing himself and he used to do drugs. Mine was probably passed on at my birth, due to some form of genetic inheritance.

    I’ve had 2 experiences with Psilocybin and their spiritually-activating properties. The intensfying imaginative effects gave me the intuition that everyone gets their emotions from somewhere. And after I learned about DMT, I came to a conclusion: that it was possibly responsible for emotional activity within most people. Interesting, isn’t it?

    If you have any comments over this theory, please tell me of them.

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